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Meditation awareness training for the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: A randomized controlled trial

Dunn, T.J., Van Gordon, W., Shonin, E., Garcia-Campayo, J. and Griffiths, M.D. (2016) Meditation awareness training for the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: A randomized controlled trial. British Journal of Health Psychology, 22 (1). pp. 186-206. ISSN 1359-107X

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Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(IS...

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this study was to conduct the first randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of a second-generation mindfulness-based intervention (SG-MBI) for treating fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Compared to firstgeneration mindfulness-based interventions, SG-MBIs are more acknowledging of the spiritual aspect of mindfulness. Design. A RCT employing intent-to-treat analysis. Methods. Adults with FMS received an 8-week SG-MBI known as meditation awareness training (MAT; n = 74) or an active control intervention known as cognitive behaviour theory for groups (n = 74). Assessments were performed at pre-, post-, and 6-month follow-up phases. Results. Meditation awareness training participants demonstrated significant and sustained improvements over control group participants in FMS symptomatology, pain perception, sleep quality, psychological distress, non-attachment (to self, symptoms, and environment), and civic engagement. A mediation analysis found that (1) civic engagement partially mediated treatment effects for all outcome variables, (2) non-attachment partially mediated treatment effects for psychological distress and sleep quality, and (3) non-attachment almost fully mediated treatment effects for FMS symptomatology and pain perception. Average daily time spent in meditation was found to be a significant predictor of changes in all outcome variables. Conclusions. Meditation awareness training may be a suitable treatment for adults with FMS and appears to ameliorate FMS symptomatology and pain perception by reducing attachment to self.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Published by Wiley. All rights reserved. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Divisions: School of Social Science
Depositing User: Dr Thomas Dunn
Date Deposited: 29 Aug 2017 12:18
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2019 14:20
URI: http://bgro.collections.crest.ac.uk/id/eprint/193

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