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Investigating the effect of exercise, cognitive and dual-task interventions upon cognitive function in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Cooke, Samuel, Jones, Arwel, Bridle, C., Smith, Mark F., Pennington, Kyla and Curtis, Ffion (2017) Investigating the effect of exercise, cognitive and dual-task interventions upon cognitive function in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Psychology Presence in the Midlands 2017, 13 September 2017, Derby.

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Official URL: http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/29151/

Abstract

Objectives/purpose: Whilst exercise, cognitive, and dual-task interventions have been shown to improve cognitive function within a healthy aging population, it remains unclear as to what effect such interventions may have in a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) population. Design: Systematic review/meta-analyses. Methods: Databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ClinicalTrial.gov, Cochrane register of controlled trials, Prospero, HTA, and DARE) of published, unpublished, and ongoing studies were searched for randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of exercise, cognitive and dual-task interventions upon cognitive function in T2DM. Results: This review identified three studies investigating the effects of an exercise intervention and one study investigating the effect of a cognitive intervention upon cognitive function in T2DM. Meta-analyses indicated a significant effect of exercise for improving global cognitive function (minimental state examination P<0.05) and inhibitory control (Stroop task P<0.05) but not working memory (digit symbol P=0.35). Calculated effect sizes of outcome measures in the cognitive study indicated a beneficial effect of cognitive training upon cognitive function in T2DM. The risk of bias assessment in this review was hindered predominantly by poor reporting practices of included studies. Due to incomplete reporting of 12 methodological procedures, two studies were judged to have a high risk of overall bias whilst the remaining two were judged as having a moderate overall risk of bias. Conclusions: The findings of the present systematic review and meta-analyses provide evidence for exercise and cognitive interventions improving cognitive function in T2DM. The poor reporting practices of included studies means that future research in this area should identify relevant reporting guidelines (e.g. CONSORT) to reduce the risk of bias and facilitate transparent reporting.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information: This item is available from the research repository at University of Lincoln.
Depositing User: Rachel Stewart
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2019 11:37
Last Modified: 23 Jul 2019 14:20
URI: http://bgro.collections.crest.ac.uk/id/eprint/481

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